Can Flavonoids Help Parkinson's Patients?

A person with Parkinson's has muscle tremors, rigidity, slowness of movement, impaired balance and a shuffling gait. Dementia (the topic of this blog series) does not affect everyone with Parkinson's, but often will. Memory impairment and trouble concentrating can show up with the increasing neurological problems.

If someone you love is diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, you may begin to research for ideas to help them. One concept you will come across is the usefulness of "flavonoids."

Flavonoids are phytonutrients (plant chemicals) found in almost all fruits and vegetables. They are powerful antioxidants with anti-inflammatory and immune system benefits.

Inflammation plays a major role in a number of diseases including cancer, diabetes, arthritis, heart failure, autoimmune diseases, and Parkinson's. Reducing inflammation is a goal of treatments to reverse or lessen the symptoms of these diseases. Diet and nutrition can help with this.

Each family will hear treatment options from doctors and others with valuable insights, and today, many people are open to alternative therapies that may not be mentioned in the doctor's office.

A story about a natural therapy that has been on TV and the internet reports the usefulness of coconut oil which is rich in antioxidants such as flavonoids. In the video, a doctor describes its usefulness for her husband's medical condition.

Another story tells about a Parkinson's patient who was helped through taking a number of tablespoons of coconut oil with each meal. He says, "I still have Parkinson['s] symptoms, but my quality of life has vastly improved."

Trying new things when life becomes difficult because of dementia and related troubles is a way of coping that may bring good results.

Actively seeking information and answers puts us in the driver's seat for our own health or for those we watch over. Let's pool our insights and keep a positive outlook.

Getting older and memory

First in a series on Dementia

Dementia is a condition of some elderly people. The older an elderly person becomes, the more likely it is that they can develop dementia.

Normally, "elderly" is defined as "over 65." It is past "middle age."

Various diseases of the nervous system and their symptoms may be involved in dementia. It is common that more than one disease process will be involved, and include both neurodegenerative and vascular diseases.

What are the neurogenerative diseases? They include Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and "amyotrophic lateral sclerosis." We will look at each of these in this blog series.

What are vascular diseases? They include stroke, "peripheral artery disease, (PAD)," blood clots, and other conditions relating to blood flow and the vascular (blood vessels) system.

As we think about dementia, let's always keep a positive outlook. Perhaps this series will help you think of ways to prevent it in your own life, or if a family member or loved one suffers from it, you will learn to understand them better.